Categorized | Press Releases

DODGERS TO CELEBRATE JACKIE ROBINSON NIGHT TOMORROW

DODGERS TO CELEBRATE JACKIE ROBINSON NIGHT TOMORROW

Don Newcombe, Tommy Lasorda, Frank Robinson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and others will participate in pre-game ceremonies

The One and Only - Jackie Robinson

honoring Robinson

WHAT: In celebration of Jackie Robinson Night, Tommy Davis, “Sweet” Lou Johnson, Tommy Lasorda, Hall of Famer Frank Robinson and former Laker and supporter of the Jackie Robinson Foundation Kareem Abdul-Jabbar will be introduced on the field, as will Jackie Robinson Team 42 Scholars.

Special Advisor to the Chairman Don Newcombe, who was also a former teammate of Robinson, will throw out a ceremonial first pitch to Dodger center fielder Matt Kemp and Newcombe and Abdul-Jabbar will address the crowd during pregame ceremonies. The National Anthem and God Bless America will be sung by R&B singer and songwriter Jeffrey Osbourne, who is best known for his hit song “On the Wings of Love.”

In addition, the entire Dodger team will wear number 42 in Jackie Robinson’s honor. The Dodgers will also wear number 42 during Friday’s game.

WHERE:         Dodger Stadium

1000 Elysian Park Ave

Los Angeles, CA 90090

WHEN:            Approximately 7:00 p.m.

MISC:             Earlier today, “Sweet” Lou Johnson represented the Dodgers in front of the city of Los Angeles city council and spoke on behalf of the organization as the city declared April 15, 2010 Jackie Robinson Day in Los Angeles.

About Mark Timmons

When you see the invisible, you can do the impossible!

14 Responses to “DODGERS TO CELEBRATE JACKIE ROBINSON NIGHT TOMORROW”

  1. Scoop/or Badger/or Rory says:

    http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/robinson.htm

    Hard to believe it took that long to get this done.

  2. Roger Dodger says:

    Tomnorrow I wear my Jackie Robinson #42 jersey where ever I go. Proud to wear it. I find that some people will ask me, “Why are you wearing that . . .?” or, “Who was Robinson #42 . . ?” That gives me a chance to tell them about Jackie.

  3. Ken says:

    And his wife was the classiest lady that I have ever seen interviewed.

    Too bad about Ausmus.

  4. Roger Dodger says:

    1 – Lincecum – 7 innings + 3

    2 – Zito – 6 innings + 4

    3 – Cain – 6.2 innings + 2

    4 – Sanchez – 4.1 innings + 7 (13 innings)

    5 – Wellemeyer – 6.1 innings + 4 (lost)

    6 – Lincecum – 7 innings + 1

    7 – Zito – 6 innings + 3

    8 – Cain – 6 innings + 3 (lost)

    average: 49.1 innings = 6.1
    Follow on pitchers: 27 = 3.375 per game (take out the 13 inning game, 20 = 2.857)
    ——————-

    1 – Padilla – 4.1 innings + 5 (lost)

    2 – Kershaw – 4.2 innings + 5 (lost)

    3 – Billingsley – 5.1 innings + 5

    4 – Kuroda – 8.0 innings + 2

    5 – Padila – 4.1 innings + 4 (lost)

    6 – Haeger – 6 innings + 2 (lost)

    7 – Kershaw – 5.1 innings + 4

    average: 38 innings = 5.4 (remember, 1 start went 8 innings; take that start out: 30 innings = 5)
    Follow on pitchers: 27 = 3.857 per game

    What does this tell me? The Giants are getting about 1 more inning on an average per pitcher per outing. The Giants need less innings from their pen per game.

    This is an important stat if it continues for the season. Tired pitching.

  5. Roger Dodger says:

    Ken, I met Rachel Robinson in 1998 when she published her book. There was a book signing in the Philadelphia area, and I was there for a conference. I drove over to the Borders where she was signing.

    When I walked in at the end of the announced time for her appearance, she was there alone. I introduced my self, and how I became a Dodger fan when I was 7 years old in 1948 because of Jackie. And have been a Dodger fan ever since.

    That about 1954 I had send him a letter (to Brooklyn) for an autographed picture and he sent a picture postcard.

    She asked about me and my family. We talked for about 15 minutes in all. She signed her new book: “To Roger . . . A long time Dodger fan, Best Wishes, Rachel Robinson.”

    The book: Jackie Robinson: An Intimate Portrait: by Rachel Robinson with Lee Daniels, Foreword by Roger Wilkins. Harry N. Abrams, Inc., Publishers.

    The book is really a picture photo book, with some very rare pictures.

    Go here:

    http://www.amazon.com/Jackie-Robinson-Intimate-Portrait-Rachel/dp/0810981890

    Notice that they have 12 new copies at $10.98, and 27 used from $0.50 (that is 50 cents). In fact, right now I see 5 copies at .50 cents. Several others for about $2 each. Plus postage at $3.99. Still a great deal, or should I say steal.

    go here: http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-

    listing/0810981890/ref=dp_olp_used?ie=UTF8&condition=used

    If you are a historic Dodger fan, and get this book, you will treasure it always.

    Here are some reviews:
    Editorial Reviews
    Amazon.com Review
    This rich collection of 301 black-and-white photographs, published in time for the 50th anniversary of the integration of professional baseball in 1947, chronicles the life of Jackie Robinson, one of America’s most beloved–and least-known–sports heroes. Robinson’s stoicism allowed him to endure racist taunts and mistreatment as the first black major leaguer, but it also kept his fans, and even his family, from seeing beyond the quiet dignity that characterized his public persona. Robinson died prematurely at age 53, having admitted that “I had too much stored up inside.” From these photos, and the text co-authored by Lee Daniel, a more full idea of Robinson, the man, emerges. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
    From Publishers Weekly
    There’s a mythical character to the story of Jackie Robinson’s life and his integration of major league baseball in 1947 that still inspires and amazes. No other professional athlete has combined such excellence and daring on the field with such a fiercely courageous social commitment off it. His wife’s straightforward portrait of her life with Jackie, written with freelancer Daniels, has much the same effect?one can’t help but admire the both of them. She met Robinson at UCLA in 1939 (“He was very impressive”), where he starred in baseball, football and track; she recounts his army career and his acquittal on drunk and disorderly charges, after a confrontation with racist military police, in a notorious court martial. She happily contrasts the warm embrace of the Canadian fans after Jackie joined the Brooklyn Dodgers top farm club, the Montreal Royals, with the racist harassment the couple experienced in Florida during that first spring training in 1946. And while she writes with the gentle, nostalgic voice of a wife and mother, Rachel Robinson has been a heroine in her own right and she notes her own formidable achievements: she was present at the strategy sessions of Robinson and Brooklyn Dodger president Branch Rickey; she runs the Jackie Robinson Development Corporation, which builds low- and moderate-income housing; and she launched the Robinson Foundation scholarship fund for minority youth after her husband’s death in 1972. There is much about their family life and 310 b&w photographs in this quietly informative and often charming retelling of a great American story.
    Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

  6. lawdog says:

    I want to take a minute to apologize to Mark and all the rest of the bloggers here for going off like a rabid wolverine on speed the last couple of days. There really is no excuse, but there are some mitigating factors.

    Has anybody else had to undergo oral surgery for impacted wisdom teeth? My head is so full of Percocet it feels like it’s stuffed with old rags and has been so for 3 days now. For whatever reason, it makes me lose all sense of proportion and go nuclear on anything that happens to be around for little or no reason.

    The throbbing has been excruciating even with my head full of this drug, but it’s starting to subside and I’ll probably be back to normal by Friday, I hope.

    In the meantime I will refrain from posting anything that might provoke a response. Ruth has threatened to lock me in the bedroom if I don’t take some valium along with this narcotic.

    I’ll have to return to the dentist again May 7th so he can extract the lower two wisdom teeth which are even more seriously impacted than the top two and I’ll probably be out of whack again for a few days at that time. I’ll keep a low profile at that time, I promise.

    In the meantime, I hope Mark and all of you will forgive me for acting like a 24 karat asshole. I’m truly sorry I put you all through my tirades and childish tantrums.

    Stay away from Percocet. It’s a bad ass drug.

    I throw myself on the mercy of the DodgerTalk Court.

    • Ken says:

      That sucks. I had four impacted wisdom teeth the first semester of law school and no insurance or money to solve the problem. After 2 months of some pain my student loans finally arrived and I had all 4 teeth taken out. However, I can not empathize with you because I went to the best oral surgeon in town and immediately returned to the law library and only took one aspirin. No pain, no swelling and no bruising. The only evidence that I had that I actually had the surgery performed was the 4 holes in my head (they are gone now) and the fellow law student that drove me back and forth to the surgeon. Best wishes on your recovery.

  7. Mark Timmons says:

    I have about 100 of those bad boys left from my hip surgery. After a week, I told my wife to hide them. They are around here somewhere.

    So Lawdog,

    Just be yourself. I might call you stupid (if you give me a segway), but you can call me that too.

    Have a take and do not suck!

    Take 2 percocets and call me in the morning.

    ;)

  8. A Shot of Haeger says:

    Lawdog, for someone affected by prescription meds, you sure wrote eloquently.

    Good Haeger to You

  9. A Shot of Haeger says:

    Here comes Charlie…. we’re gonna win in the bottom of the ninth.. i can feel it

  10. Scoop/or Badger/or Rory says:

    Sorry to hear about the tooth issues ldog. Glad to see you back. Notta to worry about a meltdown, it happens. Might happen to a lot of us if the Dodgers don’t get their collective heads out of the team lower canal.

    I watched the game as long as I could, fell asleep on my recliner, tried to tape the last few innings but didn’t extend it so, I didn’t get to see the ugly end. Probably a good thing. One thing I did notice, that umpire wouldn’t know a strike if it bit him in the ass. From what I have seen so far, looks like a league directive to increase hitting by decreasing the size of the strike zone. Pitchers and catchers from both sides were shaking their heads all night.

    We used 8 pitchers. That ain’t gonna get it for very long.

    The dbacks are a good team folks. They did lose their starting catcher Montero and Webb isn’t back, so that’s good news for Dodger fans. If they were at full strength they would challenge. Not sure they can do it without their starting backstop and ace.

    Bills doesn’t look good. Something just isn’t right about him, including his velocity. He topped out at 93, and I know he can throw harder than that. Plus, he misses his spots a lot.

    Dodgers with 19 hits and lose. And today we get Haren.

  11. lawdog says:

    Thank you all for your kindness. Wreaking havoc like I did is something that normally is not in my nature. Call me stupid, an idiot, intellectually weak, felony stupid–I usually just smile and dish a little of it back or ignore it altogether.

    After 23 years in the courtroom stuff like that was like water off a duck’s back for the most part. But percocet changed all that.

    In May when the bottom two wisdom teeth are removed I will beg of the oxycontin and have them give me hydrocodone instead and I shouldn’t turn into Mr. Hyde.

    The throbbing has stopped this morning so I’ll see how long I can get by without resorting to the happy pills that turn me into a screaming paranoid. I can’t believe there are people who pay ridiculous amounts of money to buy this stuff on the street and make themselves crazy. I just don’t see the big attraction.

    I should have given everyone a heads up before hand, but I’ve never had a bad experience with the dentist in the past and didn’t see this coming. I wish I’d had Ken’s oral surgeon.

    It wasn’t until I was in the waiting room that I noticed from his diplomas and such dressing up his wall that he’d spend many years as a Marine Corp dentist. Then I noticed the howling of the patients in front of me as he worked on them. The little bastard even jumped on a table to get a better angle with his fancy pliers. I could see it in his eyes–he had a thing about inflicting pain, especially on an old hippy type like myself. I immediately wished I’d gone somewhere else or at least opted for more than just nitrous oxide to tolerate the process.

    It’s a bummer that we went down in flames again last night. I had little hope when the ball was given to Ortiz in the 11th but what can you do when yu’ve gone through so many pitchers in so few days? Our pen ain’t what it was last year. It’s thin, overworked and unbalanced when it comes to age. Too much experience–i;e, too many geezers with marginal stuff and too few youngsters who can strike out 3 in a row when the bases are loaded and nobody is out relying just on their stuff. Hoefully that will change soon, but hey, it’s not even May!

    I loved seeing Haeger come in and pitch a shutout inning in relief with the game on the line between starts. Makes me think someone is actually listening to me in Dodgerland as I suggested they do just that while in my Oxycontin haze on the Times blog right after Charlie’s last start.

    The knuckleball puts so little stress on the arm Haeger could probably make relief appearances twice between each start and it would help him keep the dancer grooved as well as help our desperate bullpen situation. Torre was even smart enough to pitch him before Broxton which virtually assured that Broxton would make mince meat out of the Sakes when he got his turn. Let’s hope Torre has the guts to keep doing this.

    Oh, and Sherrill failed to get over 89 mph last night. I watched each pitch like the world series hung in the balance (and he didn’t throw that many pitches in any event.) If Game Day said he hit 90 or 91, their gun is definitely not calibrated the same as the MLB Extra Innings gun–not that it matters one whit. ;)

  12. Great goods from you, man. I have understand your stuff previous to and you are just extremely magnificent. I really like what you’ve obtained here, really like what you are stating and the way in which in which you assert it. You are making it entertaining and you still care for to keep it wise. I cant wait to read far more from you. That is actually a great web site.

Trackbacks/Pingbacks


Leave a Reply

Mandatory Daily Dodger Reading